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Friday, 7 September 2012

"A Lifetime Of Paying Tax Just To Be Shoved Aside By The Rich"

Deputy hits out over painful waits for ops

 Some people are waiting for operations ‘in extreme pain’, according to Deputy Jackie Hilton
ISLANDERS who cannot afford private healthcare are waiting in ‘extreme pain’ for up to a year for surgical operations, says a Deputy following the release of new figures by the Health department.

Statistics released by the department show that 99% of orthopaedic outpatients are seen by a specialist within six months, and that 93% go on to surgery within another six months after that.

They say that most go from referral to surgery within four months, but Deputy Jackie Hilton, who sits on the Scrutiny panel that oversees the Health department, says that the figures are not good enough – and that people waiting in extreme pain for hip replacements or knee surgery should be seen sooner.

And the Deputy says that she has asked the department for additional information on how private patients are treated compared to public ones. She says that she knows of one case in which a private patient was seen by a specialist and had a hip replacement within the space of a month.

3 comments:

  1. I waited over 1year for a simple hernia opp. My friend, who is covered by BUPA because she works in a bank had a similar opp. done within 10days.
    Money talks, no, it shouts!!!

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  2. And watch out for junior doctors in AE. A neighbour had a very traumatic and painful time with her daughter's dislocated elbow being "apparently" fixed and 'all this pain is in your daughter's mind' this week,

    They went back later in the day after the shift change and got it sorted out PDQ. Far too much stress for all concerned and far too much pain for far too long a time for a 3 year old girl.

    The Beano is not the Rag

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  3. At the recent scrutiny panel hearing it was explained that hospital policy was to encourage private surgery to the point where theatres were working at a dangerous 90% capacity level.

    ReplyDelete