Search This Blog

Thursday, 31 March 2011

"New Checks For Work With Children"

video
Le Marquand says "It's going to provide them with greater assurance that the people they potentially employ have been checked and there is nothing known about them which would make them unsuitable to work with a particular group of people, young people, vulnerable adults, or whatever, for whom they're being employed to work with." BYE BYE LUNDY!!!

The process by which people who work with children and vulnerable adults has been stepped up, with the introduction of a new Vetting Bureau in Jersey.

The new department has access to criminal and police files from the UK, which they use to check if people are eligible to work with youngsters.

It is hoped the bureau will make the system more robust for employers and also help them feel more confident about who they are employing.

Minister for Home Affairs, Ian Le Marquand, said: "It's going to provide them with greater assurance that the people they potentially employ have been checked and there is nothing known about them which would make them unsuitable to work with a particular group of people, young people, vulnerable adults, or whatever, for whom they're being employed to work with."

Previously, Jersey only had access to Standard Level checks, which detail every conviction recorded in central records.

But now Enhanced Checks are possible, which mean an employer can find out whether a person is banned from working with children.

Kevin McKerrell, from the Jersey Vetting Bureau, said: "For employers, they will gain not only conviction information, but also information from UK police forces, intelligence information and similar sensitive information where relevant which is held by the Independent Safeguarding Authorities, so we've secured that continuing access."

With the new Vetting Bureau up and running in Jersey, those people working with Children and vulnerable adults will undergo more rigorous checks. But at the same time it is a much more simplified system, which involves filling out an application form and showing proof of identity - and for anyone who is volunteering, the checks will be free.

For Islanders working with Brownies, Scouts and Girlguides, criminal record checks have always been compulsory. But these groups welcome the news that the full range of checks will now be carried out.

Yvonne Winspear, Girl Guides' Safe from Harm Officer, said: "If you've never done anything in your life to be worried about, why should you worry about having a check, it's not really a problem, it doesn't take very long and it makes me feel quite proud usually when I do it because I know there is nothing I have to hide. I've never really found giving information a problem unless you're trying to hide something.

"I think the centralisation of information is always a good thing because you can share it with more of the interested stake holders and the important thing is it's shared with the people who need to know."

The Vetting Bureau is calling for all employers and voluntary groups to now register their staff - and make sure children across the island are properly safeguarded.

2 comments:

  1. It is actually beginning to look as though Jersey's Child Raping Days are slowly coming to an end!

    ReplyDelete
  2. So Mario Lundy will be taking early retirement and escaping the courts.

    ReplyDelete